Merry Christmas Everyone

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Merry Christmas everyone. It’s Holiday Season already!

I want to wish everyone with ITP a joyous, full filled, and delightful Christmas. I hope your friends and families are well and that you are healthy and happy enough to enjoy this Holiday time.

I want to send out a special thank you for all your support and positive energy. Thank you for reading, sharing, commenting, and contributing to this ever growing website.

I can’t believe 2016 is nearly over. Our year began under very intense circumstances, waiting in Sydney for our little high-risk bub to be born.

ITP and also Antiphospholipid Syndrome played an enormous part in my pregnancy and BIRTH. I spent many hours in the hospital, in and out of appointments, blood tests, and OB check ups.  Continue reading

I’ve Done Something Bad…

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Feature image SEANMUNDY

I’ve done something really bad.

But it is done, so I may as well tell you what I did.

It all started two weeks ago when I dropped my son off at daycare. I left him in the capable arms of a kind woman.This kind woman cares for my son every Wednesday, and every Wednesday when I go to pick him up, I’m reassured he had the happiest, most wonderful day ever.

But two weeks ago, when I picked him up from daycare, my son was sick.

In what could only be described as a Poonami (Thank you Mander!) I spent the next week cleaning sheets, changing nappies, wiping up vomit and holding him close as he struggled with a tummy bug. He was sad, a little clingy and lost weight.

What I didn’t do, however, was take any of my medication.

A whole week. I just forgot.

I’ve been taking it every day for more than 8 years, and then suddenly I forgot. My body is addicted to it. My doctors are petrified about what would happen if I were to stop suddenly.

And then I did.

When I realized what I’d done I rushed to my medication and grabbed a glass of water, ready to take the tablet. Then something stopped me. What if I didn’t take it? What if I went just a little longer?

I had come this far, what was the harm in pushing it out a little longer?

I felt ok, I hadn’t had any terrible bruising. I wasn’t bleeding. I didn’t seem to be in adrenal failure. I was doing ok. I held the little tablet in my hand and wondered…

I knew my body needed a break from the medication, everyone agreed with that. But everyone was concerned about what would happen. It was too risky, my doctors told me. I also knew pregnancy and hormonal changes can have a huge effect on autoimmune disorders.

I decided I would wait another week. I needed a blood test and a plan. I went to the blood test centre (What are they called? Collection place?) to check my platelets.

In two weeks, without taking anything, my platelets have fallen from 52 to 41. Not bad really…

Tomorrow I have an appointment with my doctor to confess what I’ve done and have another platelet count. I’ll let you know how it goes.

What is ITP in Pregnancy?

ITP Pregnancy, gestational thrombocytopenia, immune thrombocytopenia during pregnancy, breastfeeding with ITP, birth with ITP, ITP birth plan, low platelet pregnancy

Feature image from SARAWICKAM

ITP is the abbreviation of the blood disorder Immune Thrombocytopenia. Immune Thrombocytopenia is defined as a low platelet count in an otherwise healthy individual.

If a pregnant woman develops a low platelet count during her pregnancy she will either be diagnosed with ITP or Gestational Thrombocytopenia.

If she has not previously had a low platelet count, she is more commonly diagnosed with Gestational Thrombocytopenia. If the pregnant woman has a history of low platelets it is classified as ITP in Pregnancy.

If the platelet count corrects itself after the pregnancy then she simply had Gestational Thrombocytopenia. If the low platelet count persists, she may be diagnosed with Immune Thrombocytopenia.

Pregnancy is known to lower the platelet count of almost all pregnant women in some way. The normal range of platelets in nonpregnant women is 150 to 400 making the average platelet count 250.  During pregnancy the average decreases to 213,000. Continue reading

What Not to Say to Women with a High Risk Pregnancy

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Feature image from BARNESJEWISH

“Just relax OR If it’s meant to be then it’s meant to be OR The baby will decide when it’s ready to come.”

Telling someone to relax, not only does not help them relax, but it also trivialises their stress and worry. Instead of simply dismissing the stress of a high-risk pregnancy by distracting your friend or telling her to get over it. Instead, ask her if she would like to talk about it, tell her you understand how stressful it must be, and that she is justified to worry.

Tell her that you hear her concerns and think they are valid… Then try and help her relax by actually doing something relaxing with her, not just telling her to relax and then leaving.

“Oh, Yes, I know, pregnancy is such a worry.  I remember when we were having our last baby and we couldn’t get in to see the natural therapy hypnobirthing class for three months!  It was so stressful!”

Um, not the same thing… Continue reading

Breastfeeding with ITP (Bleeding Nipples)

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Feature image from ITP&Me

Breastfeeding introduction – How it is hard and you need to feel confident and all that.  Strange new feeling like not everyone likes.

My story – I’ve been breastfeeding now (or not breastfeeding) for the last four months – what have I found.  How has the story gone…  What have I learnt and what problems have I faced?

When it gets hard…

Cracked and Bleeding Nipples?
What should I do with a low count?

Need to ask someone about this?

Lactation consultant.

What about women with bleeding disorders.

Taking care of your Nipples –

What could I do to prepare my nipples, take care of them while feeding?

Recipe from another blog about what to rub into your nipples – or perhaps just coconut oil…

So what Causes Blood in Breast Milk?

All of the breastfeeding problems listed below usually end quickly and are not considered serious…
– Cracked broken nipples and nipple blisters can cause blood in breast milk.
Read more on how to identify the cause of your cracked nipples.
– Vascular engorgement: Also called rusty pipe syndrome, due to the rusty color of the milk. This usually occurs immediately after giving birth, a first-time mommy may notice that her expressed milk is orange or pink in color. This is due to the increased blood flow to her breasts, which is needed during the development of the milk producing cells. The blood will usually disappear within a week or so after birth.

Look.  Here’s the thing.  I have breastfed a baby.  It’s a grueling if not some-what beautiful task.  I think there is a lot of romance surrounding breastfeeding to help encourage woman to continue to do it – but let me tell you it’s hard on your body, cuts into sleep time, can keep you awake for 23 hours at a stretch, saps your life and energy from your body, drains you of vitamins and minerals.

Breastfeeding is the important and special – but let’s be honest, it’s not 100% fun – not every single minute.

So when some crazy arsehole online is telling you to set aside time to soak your nipples in a saline solution – Then you’re probably going to tell them to go fuck them self.

Perhaps you might just end up doing nothing, and waiting for your nipples to heal on their own.

Please note: Although bleeding looks scary and blood may sometimes show up in your baby’s bowel motions or vomit, it is not harmful to your baby. It is quite safe for her to keep breastfeeding.

BREASTFEEDING ASSOCIATION AUSTRALIA

Increase your Platelet count during pregnancy

ITP Pregnancy, gestational thrombocytopenia, immune thrombocytopenia during pregnancy, breastfeeding with ITP, birth with ITP, ITP birth plan, low platelet pregnancy

Feature image from VERYWELL

Having a lower platelet count during pregnancy is nothing to worry about, it kind of happens to everyone.

It is natural for a woman’s platelet count to drop during pregnancy.  Gestational thrombocytopenia usually develops in the third trimester and is not known to have any harmful effects on your baby. In fact, once you deliver, your platelets will get back to their normal count.

  • Although experts do not have the exact reason, but low platelet count is said to be a side effect of pregnancy.
  • If you have found out in your reports that your blood platelet count is low, you will need to make a report of this and inform your gynecologist.

Wheatgrass

In fact, it can produce significant increases in hemoglobin, red blood cell, total white blood cell and differential white blood cell counts. This happens because wheatgrass is high in chlorophyll with a molecular structure almost identical to the hemoglobin molecule in human blood.

Simply drink ½ cup of wheatgrass juice mixed with a little lemon juice daily.  TEN HOME REMEDIES

Spinach 

Spinach is a good source of vitamin K which is often used to help treat low platelet disorder. Vitamin K is required for proper blood clotting. Thus, it reduces the risk of excessive bleeding.

Vitamin C

To increase your platelet count, you need to increase your intake of vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid. A study published in 1990 in the Japanese Journal of Hematology stated that vitamin C improves platelet count.

Being a powerful antioxidant, high doses of vitamin C also prevent free-radical mediated damage of the platelets. Your body requires 400 to 2,000 mg of vitamin C per day, depending on your age and overall health.

Zinc

Zinc is a mineral that all pregnant women should supplement with. Zinc deficiencies have been linked to fetal abnormalities and birth deformities. Zinc deficiencies have also been linked with low platelet counts, and zinc supplementation causes a dramatic rise in platelet aggregation. Reference the zinc article for information about the quality considerations of different zinc supplements.

Exercise

Healthiness – Lots and lots of healthiness.