How to Heal a Bruise is On Sale!

Bruise, bruising, itp, itp bruises, bruising easily, hide a bruise, bruises, bruises cover up, makeup bruises, low platelet count bruise, , ITP books, ITP book, meghan brewster itp, meghan itp, ITP stories, low platelet books, ITP, how to heal a bruise,

Feature image from ITP&ME

Bruise, bruising, itp, itp bruises, bruising easily, hide a bruise, bruises, bruises cover up, makeup bruises, low platelet count bruise, , ITP books, ITP book, meghan brewster itp, meghan itp, ITP stories, low platelet books, ITP, how to heal a bruise,To celebrate ITP Awareness Month, HOW TO HEAL A BRUISE on Sale!

ITP AWARENESS MONTH is a chance for people living with ITP, patients and families to come together, learn more about ITP, reflect on their own health and raise month to support ITP services.

KINDLE EDITION for only $5

HARD COPY EDITION for only $15

You can learn more about How to Heal a Bruise by following this LINK.

A Confession From Me; Why I Completely Freaked Out

low Platelets, platelets low, platelet count, what is itp, low platelet counts, itp blood, itp platelets, itp blood disease, itp autoimmune disease, itp blogs, blogs about itp, bleeding disorder

Feature image from ALLABOUTVISION

This morning I had a freak out.  Not a regular kind of ITP freak out, but a full blown monster freakout.

I thought my blood disorder was going really well.  I had been stable and healthy and happy for a long time. I felt like I was in a good place and that I could relax for a little while.  This is probably what made my freak out even worse!  Here’s what happened.

I woke up this morning, I went to the bathroom and I looked in the mirror. In the corner of my right eye was a blown blood vessel, bright and fresh, staining the corner of my eye with blood.

I did not rationally tell myself that people get blown blood vessels in their eye all the time, from sneezing, bending over, coughing, or for no apparent reason.  I did not behave like a person who has lived with ITP for more than 8 years.

I did not behave like a person who started a website about ITP, to help hundreds of patients a month live calmly and peacefully with their ITP.  Oh No!

Instead, I completely freaked out.  I told myself I was going to die; that overnight I’d been bleeding into my brain, I was convinced platelet count was below 10 and there was nothing that could be done to save my poor life.  I was a goner!

I stood there, staring at my bleeding eye.

My hair was in a big pile on my head, my pajamas were all crumpled and a little smelly.  In the strange dawn light I was sure it was a waste of time going to the hospital.  It seemed like a waste of energy.

I did not want to die in a hospital.  Better to die calmly in my own bed, I told myself.  So I went back into my bedroom and jumped into bed with my husband to die calmly in his arms.  (I kid you not this is actually what I was thinking!!)

As soon as I saw him, I immediately knew I’d over reacted.  My platelet count was 57 last week.  I didn’t have a headache, I didn’t feel sick, I wasn’t going to die.  I went back to the bathroom and looked at my eye again.

The dot of blood was tiny.  I mean tiny!  I felt foolish, paranoid and embarrassed.

So why am I telling you this?

Because living with ITP can be scary – even after 8 years.

John

Passenger plane above the clouds.

Feature image from HERE

A little bit about John…

Californian based international business consultant working in the Asia-Pacific region.

How were you diagnosed…

I was in Japan with my family on a business related trip in the Spring of 2015. Prior to our departure, I had bitten my check while sleeping and noticed that it continued to bleed. After checking into our flight to Tokyo, I noticed a large bruise forming on my left hand from where I had just been bumped by another traveler’s suitcase.

During the 9-hour plus flight, I began to feel tired and noticed I had what appeared to be a rash forming on my hands and lower arms. Upon arrival in Tokyo and after checking in to the hotel, I felt exhausted with a large headache (I travel extensively to Asia from the US, so this was unusual for me).

The next morning, after I woke up, I noticed I had what appeared to be blood blisters on my tongue as well as blood spots on the pillow case of the hotel pillow. As this was the weekend in Japan, my wife who is Japanese, suggested that we discuss this with a pharmacy (Note:  In Japan hospitals are only open for emergencies and not regular visits on the weekend).

This was done on a Saturday. The pharmacist stated that it didn’t look like an allergic reaction and I should see a regular physician. As the weekend progressed I continued to get more tired and the “rash” continued to spread on my arms and legs. My wife did some research on the internet and found information on ITP that seemed to cover my symptoms. Continue reading

Skin Care During Pregnancy

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Feature image from GRACE & GUTS

At 5 Weeks pregnant…

If stretch marks are ‘in your genes’, then I am going to get them.  Stretch marks run in my family. My mother has them, my sister has them, and I already have them on my breasts and hips.

While pregnant I am still taking a small amount of PREDISONE which damages my skin further.  Prednisone drys out my skin, making it thin and fragile.  I see the effects of taking prednisone in my weak nails, thin limp hair and dry thin skin.

So what can I do?

I’ve done a little research.  The internet recommends exercising, taking vitamin C, rubbing myself with vitamin E, keeping my skin moisturised, drinking heaps of water and eating healthy fats.  Friends are telling me to do the same.

While I am a little skeptical that these measures will work, I have nothing to loose by trying to keep stretch marks at bay?

So lets begin…
Continue reading

When Things Go Well, Do You Put it Down to Luck?

low Platelets, platelets low, platelet count, what is itp, low platelet counts, itp blood, itp platelets, itp blood disease, itp autoimmune disease, itp blogs, blogs about itp, bleeding disorder

Feature image from CHRIS BRACEY

The other day I was chatting with a friend about how well everything was going with the ITP pregnancy.  When I told her that my platelet count was high, my baby was happy and healthy, my doctors were pleased, and that I felt wonderful, I instantly added on the end – I am really lucky!  She stopped me right there.

She stopped me right there.

It was a good friend of mine who pointed out that it was not luck at all!  She drew my attention to everything my husband and I have done to make sure our pregnancy went well.

  • We found the best doctors available to us and moved 6.5 hours from our home to see them.
  • We traveled back and forth between Sydney and the South Coast to attend appointments including flying while morning sick and pregnant.
  • I was eating healthy, paying attention to diet, nutrition and cravings.
  • I researched all my medications, learnt about their side effects and took measures to combat them.
  • I read up on everything I needed to know about high-risk pregnancies.
  • We went to parent information classes.
  • I sought advice and support from people around me.
  • I pursued alternative health remedies, took herbs and supplements, drank teas, and received remedial massage.
  • I went to a KINESIOLOGIST (All though truth be told, she came to me)
  • …and a CHIROPRACTOR.
  • I walked every day.
  • I went to ballet
  • …and did yoga regularly,
  • and I was meditating to stay healthy and positive.

And yet, I am so quick to tell people how ‘lucky’ I am to be happy and healthy.

Luck would be everything going well if I did nothing to help myself.  Luck would be a positive outcome despite making no effort at all.  Luck is about success or failure brought about by chance rather than through one’s own actions.

Why am I so reluctant to say “Yeah, I fuck’en did this!”?

I did a little research on the matter and discovered that this is a trend I couldn’t ignore.  It turns out, as a group, women are more likely to attribute their success to luck and to blame themselves for their failures.  I did a lot of reading.  It is a real thing.

From the book SEX DIFFERENCES in Depression by Susan Nolen-Hoeksema, several studies have shown that ‘women tend to make more external attributions… attributing outcomes to luck or task difficulty.’  

Dr. Jacqueline Hornor Plumez also writes in her book, THAT BITCH IN YOUR HEAD, that when women fail, their inner voice says, “Dummy – You blew it,” but when they succeed, it says, ” Wow! You were lucky!”  Men tend to think the opposite: When they fail, men are statistically more likely to blame the situation or someone else but when they succeed, men take credt for being smart and competent.

When you attribute things in your life to luck, you are less likely to take credit for your success.  I need to stop telling myself that when I am unwell, I deserve it and when I am healthy – I am lucky.

When I first wrote this article I had no idea how my pregnancy was going to turn out.  Now I know that everything was more amazing than I could have hoped for.  While there were a few moments of pure luck (Having ana amazing midwife on duty when we arrived and being placed in the best room on the ward) mostly it came down to being fit, prepared, healthy, positive, determined, strong, educated, informed, and open to change – It certainly wasn’t because of LUCK!

Seeking Stories of ITP & Pregnancy

low Platelets, platelets low, platelet count, what is itp, low platelet counts, itp blood, itp platelets, itp blood disease, itp autoimmune disease, itp blogs, blogs about itp, bleeding disorder, itp pregnancy

Have you been pregnant while suffering from ITP, gestational thrombocytopenia or another bleeding disorder?

I’m currently working on a new book all about pregnancies, babies, women and blood disorders coming out in September this year!

I’m looking for stories, any interesting anecdotes and even people who I could email a few questions.

You may remain anonymous if you wish, sharing only what you wish to share.

If you have a story, please get in contact through itp.and.me.g@gmail.com.